The Wandering Traveller

Outpost of Brooklyn

 

W Vale

(The William Vale Hotel, Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Image by Greg Gordon. 2016)

Perched on stilts, an Architecture of striation and, in a lot of ways, playful fun, has risen in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The building has become the latest curiosity in the New York Architecture landscape because it directly challenges the conventional buildings rising in the city, and it also contains diametrically opposing structural systems. An interest indeed amongst the boring glass boxes peppered throughout The City.

An Architecture of Elevation. As the viewer tends to look up and at the building, it invites the passer by to stare skyward. It is a box, perched on legs, and elevated above a plaza. Hearkening back to the pure modernism of the 60’s with brutalist tendencies. The lower half exhibits a musculature akin to arms holding up a delicate layer cake. There is a directness and forcefulness to the gesture which is refreshing.

Without entering, there is a feeling that this place will become successful; Not for its gentrifying nature, but potentially only for providing delight from the relentless grid of The City. This building makes one want to find out more.

Advertisements

2015 Urban Morphology Roundup

Thank you readers for your continued interest in our blog throughout 2015. Gordon’s Urban Morphology has grown substantially in readership over our prior year as we continue to highlight subjects in New York’s built environment which have galvanized The City in one way or another.

Continuing the tradition from last year, here is our Round-Up of our most popular posts based on user clicks:

 

VISUALHOUSE NEW YORK 2030

VISUALHOUSE NEW YORK 2030

Our most popular post of 2015: Readers imaginations soared to the heights of the Supertall Skyscrapers in Imagination City


Cantilevered Condo

Our most controversial post which touched on the provocative positions which Architecture can take:  The F#ck You Building on The Fringes of Delancey


Essex_Main

The blandness of the Essex Crossing Development, sold to the public as a development which was once much more attractive: A Bait and Switch in The Lower East Side


Fountain View 2 WTC

The redesign of Two World Trade Center, and the impressions this change left us had us lament in Hunchback of The Trade


Nordstrom Spire

And New York’s next great Supertall had its top lopped off in The Central Park Spire, Revisited


Two Tenements Down_2

While our most poignant post revisited a piece of Tenement history, befallen by the wrecking ball in Two Tenements, Down


 So, there you have 2015’s top posts. Thanks again for your readership and stay tuned for 2016 where we’ll continue to strive to bring fresh perspectives on our Changing City. Happy New Year from Gordon’s Urban Morphology.

Canyons of New York

Canyons_1

(Urban Canyons of New York, Image via ILNY / Skyscraperpage. 2015)

New Brusque City, via Urban Canyons of The rising Westside. Up and around the environs of West 42nd Street, Our Urban landscape is being transformed into a new, and oftentimes unrecognizable, landmass.

Buildings of immense scale and height resting side by side, non-deferential to sunlight or privacy for their inhabitants. This phenomenon of relentless, developer driven construction has picked up pace since the last recession ended here a few years ago. It continues unabated and will continue until this stretch of Manhattan’s Westside becomes one big Urban Canyon. Fast forward to The not-too-distant future: One will be able to rise to the perimeter of these luxury boxes, via sky-elevator, and look down into the shadowy chasms of the streets below.

This particular piece of Manhattan is past the point worth saving for harvesting any meaningful relationship to the human condition. It has transformed into a spectacle unto itself. Might as well keep going and make it complete as New York’s next great tourist attraction. The Grand Canyon of Manhattan. Come here twice a year to watch Manhattanhenge, between the slivers of sky. Come here to race down 42nd Street, where parkland on The Hudson awaits. Come here with a selfie stick, and drop the plastic wrapper which it came in, onto the windswept streets of New Brusque City.

Remnants on The Urban Fringe

Urban Mass

(Urban Relic, Redhook, Brooklyn. 2015. Image by Greg Gordon)

Urban Fringe of NYC, one of the last bastions of Old Industrial New York. Walk to The Edge and you will find the relics which housed the infrastructure of a once burgeoning Industrial City. Relic’s unused, standing as memorials, partially preserved for the Urban Wanderer.

Urban Tower

(Infrastructure Remnant, Redhook, Brooklyn. 2015. Image by Greg Gordon)

An exercise in the Poetics of Form, through necessity. Big skeletal tower. Solid little building. Now a curious composition which could be mistaken as an installation by The Builders of Our Past. Totems from a prior Time, waiting for preservation, on The Fringes of New York.

Vintage Stock of NYC

Vintage Stock_Williamsburg

(Construction of The Williamsburg Bridge, New York, 1903. Image by Ewing Galloway)

For all the mapping fans, and the historical photo fans of New York’s History: The New York Public Library has released an interactive photo map highlighting numerous locations across The City. For a fun historical tour of many familiar and some long gone places, you can click HERE.

It’s the Vintage Stock of NYC.

The New Whitney : Americana Projected

Whitney_Ed Lederman

(The New Whitney, An American Projection, New York, NY. 2015. Image by Ed Lederman)

The New Whitney, in Manhattan’s West Side / Meatpacking District is set to open on May 1st, and already the reviews are rolling in. So, in a spirit to look past those reviews (some good, some not so good) Our blog celebrates the transformative nature that such a structure brings to a once derelict part of The City. Aesthetics aside, a new museum, any new museum only serves to add as a cultural anchor in the placemaking structure of a Metropolis.

Oftentimes, critics jump at the chance to take shots at what many perceive as a positive force, or in the particularities of a buildings aesthetic nature. While valid as criticism, these gestures often miss the mark of true intention.

People must remember, when reading criticism, that buildings take many years to formulate through ideas and ultimately the execution by thousands of people. Involving multiple hands in the act of construction, they serve as monuments of inspiration not only for ART people, but for everyday people; The Union people and the Industry of Craft.

So, as the criticism of this particular building gets solidified by the arbiters of Architectural taste (mind you they oftentimes write about buildings, but do not actually build them), remember as you read, that this particular emblem is foremost a celebration of the American Spirit. Muscular in true intention. The opening of this emblem is a projection, both inward and outward, of the Everyday People. It almost serves to defy criticism by merely existing.

A link to The Whitney’s descriptive video on the building can be found HERE.

A pragmatic take and cool video on The Museum, not necessarily criticism, from the New York Times can be found HERE.

Market Down

Essex Demo

(View of the Old Essex Market Demolition, New York, NY. 2015. Image by Greg Gordon)

The time has finally come for the transformation of the Empty Void of the Lower East Side. Demolition Porn at its best. Buildings in their half state.

In this image, we see the remains of the Old (abandoned) Essex Market building coming down to make way for the first “Gateway” structure of the Essex Crossing Development. You can read more on our opinion on this replacement complex HERE, but we won’t digress.

Back to the shot. Every once in a while, a building comes down and reveals a bit of character in the process. Sometimes it may be a room revealed with contents still in place, say when a facade is shorn from a building. In this case, a parting dose of color pops out behind what was once a rather unassuming brick wall. The structure revealed, soon to be dismantled by the Local Ironworkers.